Migration for welfare (WELLMIG) Nurses within three regimes of immigration and integration into the Norwegian welfare state

Researchers

Marie Louise Seeberg. Foto: NOVA

Project leader Marie Louise Seeberg, NOVA.

Marie Louise Seeberg, project leader
NOVA – Norwegian Social Research, Oslo Metropolitan University

Seeberg is a social anthropologist and co-ordinator of NOVA’s Working Group for Migration and Transnationality. She has conducted research on ethnicity and migration for 25 years. She has earlier worked on the research project Immigrant women in health care professions, and led the research project Global care workers in the Norwegian welfare state: care chains, intersectionality and social capital, both of which focused on migrant health workers in Norway. In addition to nurse immigration to Norway, her research topics include relations of diversity and ethnicity in Norwegian schools and workplaces, refugees and asylum seekers in Europe, and child migration. She currently leads Contested Childhoods, a Research Group within IMISCOE (International Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion in Europe, Europe’s leading network for scholars in the field).

Marta Bivand Erdal
The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO)

Erdal is a Senior Researcher at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO). She is a Human Geographer and has conducted research about Polish and Pakistani migration with focus on remittances, return migration and the interactions of migrant transnationalism and integration processes. Erdal is interested in intersections of economic and social considerations in migration decision-making and migrant nurses experiences.

Jørgen Carling
The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO)

Carling is Research Professor of migration and transnationalism studies at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) with a PhD in Human Geography. His research addresses a broad range of themes including migration theory, migration management, transnational families, remittances, and the links between migration and development. He has led several collaborative research projects including Theorizing Risk, Money and Moralities in Migration (2009–2014), Possibilities and Realities of Return Migration (2011–2016), ­and Transnational Lives in the Welfare State (2014 –2019). Carling has published more than 40 journal articles and book chapters and also carried out policy-oriented work for various governmental and international agencies. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford (2005), the National University of Singapore (2010), and the University of Maastricht and UNU-MERIT United Nations University (2016).

Aslaug Gotehus
NOVA – Norwegian Social Research, Oslo Metropolitan University

Gotehus is a doctoral researcher at NOVA and a PhD student at the Department of Sociology and Human Geography at the University of Oslo. She holds a Master’s degree in Development Studies from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. In her master thesis, she explored the links between migration and human trafficking and analyzed the local conceptualization of the term. Gotehus’ focus in the WELLMIG project will be on nurses from the Philippines and how they are affected by structural changes related to migration policies.

Elzbieta Gozdziak
Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University

Goździak is Visiting Professor at the Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland and an Adjunct Lecturer at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She co-leads, with Marie Louise Seeberg, Contested Childhoods, a Research Group within IMISCOE (International Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion in Europe, Europe’s leading network for scholars in the field). Between 2002 and 2018, she served as Research Professor at the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM) at Georgetown University. In the Fall of 2016, Elzbieta was the George Soros Chair of Public Policy at the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary. She also served as Senior Public Health Advisor in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

She has 30 years of experience conducting research to inform migration policy, including studies of migrant nurses and healthcare workers in ageing societies. Trained in social and cultural anthropology, she brings to this project methodological expertise in conducting qualitative studies using ethnographic interviews, focus group discussions, and participatory action research.

Izabella Main
The Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology at the Adam Mickiewicz University

Main is an assistant professor at the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology at the Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań (AMU) and the Secretary of the Centre for Migration Studies at AMU. She is a social and cultural anthropologist and a historian. She has conducted research about Polish migration in Europe with a focus on access to healthcare, medical practices, reproductive healthcare, and medical tourism. Currently, Main is leading the project on female mobility between Poland and Norway (Mobile Lives, Immobile Realms).

Marek Pawlak
Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Jagiellonian University

Pawlak is a social and cultural anthropologist working at the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow (Poland). As a researcher, he also closely collaborates with the Centre for Migration Studies (CeBaM) and the​ Jagiellonian Centre for Migration Studies (JCSM). He brings to this project several years of experience conducting multisited fieldwork in Norway and Iceland as well as research on Polish and transnationalism, regimes of mobility, crises​ and migration, and ​identity politics.

Hans Christian Sandlie
NOVA – Norwegian Social Research, Oslo Metropolitan University

Sandlie is a Senior Researcher and Research Director at Norwegian Social Research (NOVA) with a PhD in Sociology. He research addresses a broad range of themes within housing and life courses.  In recent years, he has also conducted research on labour migration with focus on housing and integration in the labour market. Sandlie brings to this project several years of experience using quantitative data and his main responsibility within the project is to conduct quantitative analysis based on administrative register data.